Anonymous Miner II Original Blueprint Owner Discovers Productivity Threshold | EVE Online

Anonymous Miner II Original Blueprint Owner Discovers Productivity Threshold

LUSTREVIK – Researchers at the anonymous corporation holding the controversial original Miner II blueprint released information that has galaxy-wide financial implications for both owners and consumers of advanced technology. “We discovered that we can’t increase the production rate by copying the original,” explained the corporation’s CEO. “This is going to have a really, really serious impact on the way future tech will be produced--if the trend continues, there will be a lot of item monopolies created.“

A researcher from the anonymous corporation explains. “A competent researcher requires 7 1/2 days to produce a copy that will produce 300 lasers—the maximum number permitted from the copy. The factory can churn out a maximum of 48 lasers a day, so the only way I could increase productivity is if I could somehow copy the original in under 6 days. Even if my researching ability was at the highest skill level possible, that’s still an impossible number to beat.”

The CEO continued for the researcher: “We worked out that if the copy runs were at 100 hours as stated on the blueprint, we could, by continuous copying, increase supply over time. That way, if we managed to get a slow increase in production capacity, we were looking to drop the prices over time so our income remained the same, but Miner II production increased. The 1m isk Miner II would have been about a month away.”

Asked about how these discoveries affected their own marketing plan for the mining lasers, he replied “Our original plan was based on constant revenue for us, with rising production resulting in naturally falling prices. As it stands now, we're looking at a randomized waiting list, with a below-market rate price at about 2m per laser. But we'd have to check out our competitor’s prices more fully, as we intend to be cheaper.

We asked when the anonymous CEO planned on going public with his identity: “Right now that’s purely a function of getting our online order processing system up and running. We’re very concerned about customer satisfaction, and the best way to achieve that is by creating a reliable system for managing order flow. In the meantime, we’re building up our supply to accommodate the anticipated initial burst of demand.”

The CEO is hopeful that the system will go live by the end of this week, pending the successful completion of ongoing testing and debugging.